Looking at Studio Fees

For the last year all the potters at the studio have been required to measure the pieces they’ve made and placed into a glaze firing. Supposedly this was to determine the use per person and to collect data to support a new fee schedule that would require “production potters” to pay their fair share. The results were in. It showed exactly what we all knew – there are a handful of people who produce an extraordinary amount of work. And “surprise!” it has peaks that occur within a month of the major art shows in the area. After the little presentation complete with graphs and tables the studio management announced that the measurements would continue for another year BUT in response to the data they were increasing the class fees by $20 but giving us a bag of clay for “free”. I still have about 60 pounds of clay on my shelf. I don’t need any more clay. It begs the question, if they have identified the production potters why are they increasing the class fees across the board? Why not just charge the production potters the extra cost for hogging the kiln? If history repeats this is what will happen (mark my words as I’m going to come back to this post in a year or 2 and see if I was right): The fees will increase but we get 25# of “free” clay. The cost of the clay is either $16 for dark grog stoneware, $18 for white stoneware, and a whopping $20 for porcelain clay. After a year (3 semesters), the free clay will be taken away but the fees will stay the same. Then in another year they will bump the fees up another $10 or more making the class almost too expensive for the average person to afford.

Amid all the fuss I managed to get a couple more pieces back. First is the coccidia orb. Coccidia are a single celled parasite that lives in the intestinal wall. They cause bleeding and diarrhea that can be life threatening in very young or debilitated animals… This piece is glazed with Gold Shino with Blue accents.
ย 
The second one is one that you either love or hate – it is composed of a multitude of faces painted with varying concentrations of red iron oxide stain. I had purchased this mold for faces that was designed for making candy! No kidding. If you think it is weird as part of a clay sculpture just imagine eating little chocolate candies with faces!

We are in Orlando and heading to Universal Studios for the day. Harry Potter World is on the agenda. The weather is a balmy 70 degrees with sunny skies. I put on sunscreen just in case….

26 thoughts on “Looking at Studio Fees

  1. I like the faces, what I can see of it. Don’t care for the color of the first. ๐Ÿ™‚ To bad you can’t find a kiln some where else. One that has better policies.

    Like

    1. The studio is a private endeavor located in a public space and supported through grants, gifts, and generous donors. The city doesn’t charge them “rent” so the space is owned by the city but used by the Museum education group…

      Like

        1. I’ve been at it a while… if there was an alternative I’d jump for it. Right now my options are there or a private studio that is much more expensive, or set up my own at home (but since it is just a hobby I can’t afford that kind of investment…)

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I love the wide wonderful weird world of faces! You should put that one in a show! And I definitely prefer faces to anything to do with feces! And that includes parasites in the intestines. So sorry to be so sincerely honest, but you know I love you and not Just because I have to.

    Like

  3. I am a bit discomfited by pastries with faces. Little chocolate candies that look back at me would not be altogether welcome. Community kilns tend to up their prices here, depending on what the power company has up its sleeve.

    Like

    1. It was warm but not hot – did get a little sun but not a burn!! And even though there were lots of small children on the plane ride home all were well behaved and quiet – a real bonus!

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s