Looking at the da Vinci

If you didn’t know, we are now in the “future” as far as surgery. It is now common place to undergo robot assisted surgery. I’m writing about this because my husband is preparing for a da Vinci procedure to repair his hernias. The benefits of the robotic assisted surgery include:
Decreased rate of hernias returning
Shorter hospital stays
Fewer complications
Less blood loss
Reduced need for narcotic pain medicine
Faster recoveries
Minimal scarring

The doctor is of the opinion that he will be up and about after a few (3) days and shouldn’t expect to miss any work. Of course this is optimistic. Sparky is after all a 100% red-blooded male who whimpers like a 3 year old when having a splinter removed, a man that can’t put in eye drops without assistance (that includes a head lock). In the interim he has been banned from certain activities in the gym – no squats, no weights, no squats with weights, and no rowing. On the bright side he won’t have to do any bowel prep. And there will be minimal incisions, just 3 tiny ones at each groin and at the navel. The procedure will occur on Monday. So I’m bracing for 3 days of pure chaos. If I’m MIA it is because I’m taking care of the invalid….

35 thoughts on “Looking at the da Vinci

  1. He will survive and spend time looking at the spots the robot entered. It will probably remain visible a few years after. Oh wait he doesn’t have my stretch marked abdomen. LOL

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    1. Thanks Kate! He wouldn’t make it through labor and childbirth. He is very optimistic about his recovery. He thinks that by Tuesday he’ll be able to go out for dinner for my birthday… I’ll see but won’t be surprised if he is “done in” by dinnertime. I suspect it will just be me and the boys.

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                    1. He is fully awake and is groaning when he has to go from standing to sitting or sitting to laying down… at least the pain is tolerable and he is back to taking Tylenol alone so it can’t be too bad.

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    1. We are also in a no whine zone but this is his first experience with surgery – not bad for 62 yrs old. We are heading into the unknown but based on past experience with little things, he might be a little out of sorts and he has already started to anticipate unpleasantness!

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  2. I am glad I decided to catch up on your blog! I wouldn’t have known about Sparky facing surgery if I hadn’t. Let me know when he has this done so I can send a card to him. I hope it will go well & he will have a speedy recovery. He’s lucky to have you, for you are a good, compassionate and skilled nurse!

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  3. prayers and best wishes for the man. these procedures would not be possible without the brilliance of microchips, they write the programmes that control the robots. as you listed out so perfectly, it will be as least invasive and recovery will be faster. all my best to you too, dear caregiver!

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  4. 20 years ago, the cancer (and stage) I have had a 23% 5 year survival rate. Today, it has an 87% survival rate. The surgery (laser) they used to remove my 14 tumors (and gall bladder, and appendix, and small intestine) left four tiny slits, each as thick as a paper cut and 1/2 inch long. It left no long term scar. You do not have to convince me that the medical future is upon us.

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  5. My cat had two hernias. She wouldn’t let me give her pain meds and had to sit in a cage by herself for a month with a giant scar. It was in a closet, too. She was very well behaved. Keiko gets a sore tummy and vomits, and it’s the end of the world. 888 dollars for a sour stomach because he wouldn’t stop making odd noises and acting like it was the end of days. Typical male behavior! Then when I give him his medicine for it, I have to chase him around the apartment and hold him in a death grip. Then he mopes and feels sorry for himself. Good luck!

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  6. Wish him speedy recovery, and good healing. Hope everything turns out just perfect for him. Glad he is getting the procedure done now and not when a portion of the bowel gets trapped in the hernia.
    Do you need to take some medication so that you are knocked out for three days?? I am just kidding. All the best Val.

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    1. I was monitoring him for a strangulation. The surgery went well and the patient is resting (un)comfortably… He wants chicken noodle soup for dinner so that’s what he’ll get.

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    1. The surgery only lasted an hour but we were there at 8:15 AM until 3:05 PM. For not having done anything all day I’m tired! The patient is doing great and hasn’t asked for any pain medication so that’s a good sign.

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