Covid versus Corvid

There is no lull in the news concerning the coronavirus referred to as COVID-19 that emerged in the Wuhan area of China. It is spreading throughout the US at an alarming rate. When I left for my road trip there were cases in California, Washington, New York, and Florida. They were supposedly contained. There are now confirmed cases in nearly every state. Those states without confirmed cases just aren’t testing. The states are pretty much on their own since our government has not responded with any clarity or speed. Here in Indiana, the schools have closed and switched to all online learning, all gatherings are cancelled, even my ceramics class has been postponed. Currently there are a few places that continue to operate – Planet Fitness, most restaurants (but they urge you to do carry out). Even the Catholic Church has closed. The Bishop has declared that there will be no Sunday obligation and no public Mass for all of March. All church events have been called off – Feast of St. Joseph dinner, trivia night, youth group, all meetings (even AA), and the soup suppers. It is a scary time. Even so, I won’t lie. When I first saw the headlines proclaiming COVID-19 linked to hundreds of deaths in China, my though was “Dang it! The crows (Corvids) are being blamed again!” Of course they are not the culprits after all. That “R” makes all the difference. I’m relieved because I like crows. They are smart. They are problem solvers and even use tools. They are social and loyal (mating for life) and they believe in family. The knowledge of one generation is passed on to another. It includes what to be afraid of and who is a friend. They will even thank humans who feed them by leaving trinkets. For 27 years I walked into work at the same time every day. Most days the “Crow Boys” as I named them, would caw a greeting from their perches on the roof peaks as I walked to the building. There were three of them and they would fly down to look me over when I’d wear a different hat. They recognized my chipmunk, rabbit and bear hats. One summer I tossed some leftover potato chips into the trash barrel at the entrance to the parking lot. They went wild. For a couple weeks they would swoop down to sit on the fence and the barrel edge as I approached. Most of the time they would be disappointed and it would show in their attitudes and postures. But when I would toss anything edible in they were like kids on Christmas! That is the only part of working that I really miss…

Murder is in the air

Rise and fall of black confetti
Midwestern volcanic ash rains
Too big and black for cinders
Carried on currents chaff from grains

Observe sesame sprinkled clouds
I scan the sky at fading light
They sift earthward soot flakes
Swept away on windy winter night

37 thoughts on “Covid versus Corvid

  1. yes I sense most of our govts are not stepping up quick enough … there is huge panic buying here! No idea how people can store or afford so many groceries. Sad part is that the supermarket aisles are totally crowded and people queued for four hours sometimes … this is a sure way of passing anything on … and we used to worry about the doctors surgery 😦

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    1. My son works at a grocery – so far he’s been busy in the deli. They no longer have a serve your self salad bar so he’s been making packaged salads and of course frying chicken and fish. People have been good about standing away from each other. Some of the stores are putting in “elder hours” where only shoppers over 60 are allowed in the store – supposedly to cut down on exposures… We haven’t gone to the store since before the big shut down. I guess my husband’s pack rat tendencies are a good thing after all!

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      1. living tiny wouldn’t allow me to stock much past a few days needs but fortunately I’m at the family home which has more than ample space for a couple of weeks supplies πŸ™‚

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          1. no just me my echo and my shadow .. had a few friends for the first weekend but that’s their only spare time πŸ™‚
            I love people but I am a loner πŸ™‚

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            1. At this time being a loner is a good thing. We are resisting going anywhere – even the store… Sparky is jonesing for bananas and cucumbers but he’s going to have to do without for now. Guess he’ll have to make due with apples, oranges, pears and an odd mango or two…

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                  1. lol I resisted the temptation πŸ™‚
                    Got the groceries I needed and am typing away here with the lovely blue ocean lapping in front of me πŸ™‚ oh and the surfers always provide eye candy πŸ™‚

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                    1. Next to the car?!?! I hope they are all “beautiful people” – nothing would ruin my day more than seeing a couple wrinkled and saggy butts… or worse!! Sounds like it isn’t dull anyway.

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  2. Yes, the poor crows seem to irritate some people by their sheer numbers. Before West Nile virus established itself in our area, we had a wonderful population of these beautiful birds. Thank goodness, they have reestablished their populations again. We see the occasional raven but it’s so hard to tell the difference from a distance that I can’t be sure which is which. It’s always a treat to have an interaction with these intelligent Corvids.

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    1. I agree that some folks have an issue with the crows but I’ve always admired them. You never see a starving crow or one that has fallen from a nest… a couple years ago West Nile had them falling from the sky but ours have bounced back too.

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    1. Hey! Thanks for the visit and the kind compliment! It is always nice to see a former Xangan in these parts. Do you have a WordPress page? I see your posts on FB but I really despise doing anything on there – you make a comment and all of a sudden your phone blows up as every one who also comments ends up as a message to you as well!

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        1. Dodi I’d love to turn off my notifications. I almost unfriended a person because she added me to a list of 150 people and my phone was nonstop. It took me 2 days to figure out why FB was going crazy. I was able to finally leave the list and now all is back to as normal as it gets. I turned off the sound so I don’t hear the constant dings!

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  3. There is so much panic in the world right now. I am cautious but not overly panicked. But the trucks have to keep rolling if all possible or there will be even more panic.

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  4. Now my old brain is searching for the difference between spellings, is there a difference?

    toilet paper, wipes, milk you name it, gone from the shelves. Our church may have closed but they have a team of volunteers to shop for folks like me. I was their trial run. Over 4 stores Kate went to and had to get toilet paper from her home.

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  5. It took 2 weeks to infect 234 people in Florida. Hardly a wildfire. In contrast, the “stupid” virus attached to Covid -19 seems to have infected billions, including the entire journalism field.

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    1. I appreciate your take, though from an epidemiological point of view, 234 confirmed cases represents only a small fraction of the infected persons. The majority infected do not show signs severe enough for medical intervention. So the number infected is likely more like 45,000 with only 234 severe enough to require hospitalization. I do agree that panic buying is unnecessary and those trying to profit off of shortages are only contributing to the problem.

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      1. Well, we can agree on the part about 234 is just a sampling of those infected, but that is my point. How dangerous can it be if only a small fraction of the population show symptoms? What if they test a million people tomorrow, and find out they have the virus but it is having no affect on them? I think most people are prudent enough to take precautions, but to start to shut down governments and borders, ruin thousands of small businesses, putting millions out of work, for something that is no more lethal than the common cold?

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    1. I agree. Prompt action and the availability of testing kits would have made it less of a problem. Though I think it will have to run its course. The precautions currently are attempting to limit the number of people requiring medical treatment at the same time…

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    2. It is hardly a pandemic. When the Black Plague struck, it spread faster, and infected 3/4 of the human population, killing half. This was during a time before cars and airplanes, and sailing across the ocean took 30 days on ships that carried 100 passengers. After 3 weeks, this Corona “problem” has infected less people than it would take to fill a Siberian town, and killed less than you could find at Walmart on EBT day, in spite of thousands of transatlantic and transpacific flights during that period. But hey, we need a good news story, so lets trash the world’s economy! How can we do that? By using scary words over and over again on TV!

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    1. I’m all for flattening the curve but that doesn’t have anything to do with hoarding and panic buying. I imagine that there will be quite a few people with enough TP that they won’t have to buy any for 6 mos to a year! I guess when they have to cover it with a table cloth and call it an end table they’ll regret their greedy behavior!

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