Looking at Dogs

It is no secret that Sparky really wants a dog. He reminds me of a teen girl going through the “boy crazy” phase. Or maybe it is more like the young woman who has “baby fever”. Either way every time he sees a dog he wants to pet the dog. Then he sighs like a love sick moose and starts looking at dog videos on line. The neighbors on the corner by the playground got a Golden Retriever puppy (Winston). The thing is growing fast. This puppy will be a really big dog. So far their training had consisted of picking the dog up and carrying it when it wouldn’t do what they wanted. At last look this puppy was the size of Ranger dog at the end of his days (about 50 pounds). As we were making a lap around the block, the owners and their puppy were outside attempting to teach him to sit. Sparky wanted to go steal the dog and take it home. Not because they weren’t doing a good job or were mistreating the dog. No, he was just considering breaking the 7th Commandment and definitely breaking all to pieces the 10th Commandment! He just wants his own dog.

However I’m not caving on this point. We do not need a dog at this time. I do not want a dog right now. Sparky has gone from wanting a Border Collie to thinking he would welcome a Beagle. He’d even take a Poodle, or a Schnoodle, maybe even a Shihua… I caught him looking at those adoption pages. Sure the photo was cute but the scrip with it made me question his sanity. “Adorable older dog – Has the energy of a puppy at 9 years old. Has been in 4 foster homes in the last 2 years. Does not tolerate other dogs, cats, or small children. Would do well with a home that has a set routine and predictable schedule – preferably retired individual(s) who can devote attention to this high-energy cuddle bug.” The photo showed the dog (a long haired mop in a nest of blankets on the sofa). Every fiber in my body screamed NO. When reading further it noted that the dog was trained to go on Puppy Pads and did not tolerate crating. The behavioral profile said that the dog was “cautious with strangers and required patience”. All that was a huge red flag.

Yes I looked. I am an animal lover. I wouldn’t mind having a dog in a few more years – after we do some traveling. And if we get a dog, I will require Sparky to do the majority of training. It will happen but I’m picky. I’ve worked at a no-kill shelter. The ads attempt to sugar coat the truth without telling complete lies and I know how to read between the lines. So for now I’m saying no… Unless the perfect dog appears. So I’ll let him continue his search. And I’ll keep saying no until I say yes.

53 thoughts on “Looking at Dogs

  1. I understand both of your stances on a pet. I’ve longed for a companion animal in my life for a long time; but I haven’t had the lifestyle that would allow me to be a good pet owner. I was away from home too many hours in a day, even for a cat. Add that for most of my life I couldn’t afford the vet bills, nor could I accommodate the room for a litter box or crate, and I knew I couldn’t be a decent pet owner.

    Doesn’t stop me from sighing and enjoying my friend’s pets, though.

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  2. We had a dog ( spaniel )between 1965 and 1976 It was a good friend for our 6 children . But since then we could not have a dog because we don’ t have a close space in our property and we live at the side of a very active street.
    Poor Sparky ! πŸ™‚
    Love ❀
    Michel

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    1. Ranger and Buckaroo were both very good dogs. Now is not the time to take on a new dog. But one day we will get another one. Having a really good dog makes you long for another.

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  3. Sparky needs to go volunteer at an animal shelter, all day long, every day, for a while. πŸ˜‰ I know, I see you shaking your head, but…it would ease his itch a bit, plus give him a tiny taste of reality. I know, I’m dreaming (for you, though. Does that count? πŸ˜‰

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  4. Next door has 3 puppies and mama dog that gets out of the yard and runs to my house. Mutt mix. Trying to involve city to cite him has done no good. She gets under my feet and runs in my house if I open the door, she’s faster than I am. Friends tell me to adopt her. I’m 80 they are nuts.

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    1. If she is in your house, you can call the pound and have them pick her up as a stray. The neighbor will have to provide proof of vaccination and pay to get her back… That should solve the problem of the dog trying to get in the house but might create ill will with that neighbor. Hope some resolution can be had before the dog causes an injury to you or Wil!

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  5. I’m a dog lover and would feel bereft without at least one in my house. We have two now, the world’s friendliest mix of Black Lab and American Bull, and the world’s unfriendliest mix of Boxer and Pit Bull. They get along well together, and with our cat, but dog #2 does not do well with other dogs, strangers, guests, delivery people, handymen, etc. She was a two-time loser at the pound (returned twice before we got her) and her time was running out. But dog #1 was crazy about her. Lovesick. So she went home with us. She is 9 now, more chilled out but still does “zoomies” every day. I did a post about her a few years back where she tells her own story in a poem. https://justjoan42.wordpress.com/2016/06/05/anniversary-of-a-freedom-ride/

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    1. I’m a sucker for happy endings! So nice to hear that Callie was successfully blended into the family. I do believe that rescues know that they have been given another chance (or three) and are the most grateful of animals no matter the breed!

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  6. Our boys have been with us 8.5 years and Wrangler has had Rex for 14 years. 10 of those I have been around for. With older dogs we are having to plan for the dreaded day some. I think we will get another dog because Cinch needs the company but it will be a grown dog and not a puppy.

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    1. I’m not a fan of the hassle of house breaking a puppy… An adult dog is so much more fun since you can bypass the unpleasant and stinky process. I hope Rex stays in good health for a few more years and gets to live his best life on the road!

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        1. Hehe! I hear you! Ranger (male) was a real pain to house break compared to the previous dog (female). I am not looking forward to that routine so I agree that an older dog would be a nice change!

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    1. He is being patient. The dog crazy thing is cyclical and it will fade soon and then come again when he sees another puppy! Fortunately he can get a dog fix at saintvi’s house!

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  7. interesting responses BUT if you intend to travel it’s really not wise!

    Like the idea of Sparky volunteering at a shelter to get some ‘dog’ time πŸ™‚

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    1. We will travel as soon as this COVID business is done… The volunteering is a nice thought but he would come home with more than one dog! As a Vet Nurse I’ve had my share of animals that I “couldn’t resist saving”. It will be a few years before we get another dog. But in the meantime Sparky can visit with his sister’s 2 dogs, the neighbor’s dogs and saintvi’s dog… no lack of canine contact here!

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  8. As a self-described doggiephile, my heart goes out to Sparky. Here’s the thing, if you wait until you are done traveling to adopt a dog, you have to make sure you have godparents lined up in case you die before it does. So, if you can find a godparent for your dog, you can get one now and leave it in the care of his godparent when you travel. Problem solved.
    There are so many dogs whose staff have aged out and need a home. Ask your vet if he knows of someone who is moving into an assisted living facility and needs to place a beloved companion. No potty training, no chewing, no spaying, just a well-adjusted dog who is accustomed to having attentive staff. Tell Sparky he can thank me later.

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    1. We’ve got that covered… the Godparents thing anyway. I’m all for an adult rescue but it has to be the right dog. At present I’m not looking for a dog and Sparky knows that it is not the right time. So he is being patient. But he has put a dog on his Christmas list!

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  9. Though I’ve always had multiple pets I am loving the freedom to just pack up and go when I want. I miss having a pet and all the love they provide but I don’t miss the anguish when wanting to see more of my country. As a compromise I feed the native animals and birds and visit the local shelter with donated goods once every couple of months. It’s enough. No guilt – after bringing up kids and numerous animals along the way it’s my turn to be nurtured.

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    1. It was always a problem if we wanted to travel – we’d bribe the boys to come over and take care of the dog – they could stay over night and eat anything they wanted to fix from the refrigerator or freezer! It was a win-win especially when Ranger got really old and didn’t take to a change in environment (he was deaf and going blind so being in a strange place was really stressful). Now if we want to go out for dinner we don’t have to rush home to let him out and give him his dinner… not to mention travel. So there is no guilt and that is a lovely situation.

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        1. Ther eare 2 dog breeds that I’m partial to – the Australian Shepherd and the Border Collie. We’ve had 2 Australian Shepherds and they were both good dogs (one better than the other) and I think it is the Border Collie’s turn. My first job after graduation, my boss had a Border Collie that I loved. She was so smart and loyal and yet friendly. If (when) we get one, I’m naming her “Rookie” after that wonderful dog… But don’t tell Sparky!

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    1. I had the morning and evening meal prep. Sparky was in charge of all walks and poop scooping. I provided medical care and Sparky had to do all bathing! So it was a joint venture… Same for any future pets!

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    1. Life sans canine is not apocalyptic. Life goes on and there is no picking up klinkers in the backyard, no flung dung when mowing, and no one to blame stinky farts on… I’m good.

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  10. Getting a dog is a huge step, and you are right to wait until you are sure you both want one. And yeah, that ad had was nothing but one large red flag!! Personally, I don’t want a home with out a dog, so I understand your husband’s position, but still…it has to be right for both of you.

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    1. Indeed the ads are very interesting. I’m pretty sure some of them sucker people, which is why there are so many “returns”. When the right one is available and the time is right, we will become dog owners again!

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  11. Good way to handle it – continue to say “no” until you say yes. We haven’t had a dog in years, and have lots of good reasons for not having one – yet I sometimes think that maybe we should consider getting another one.

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  12. I’ve had Roxie for almost ten years, since she was about 4 weeks old, and she is my furbaby and companion. She’s been with me through the roughest of times and I couldn’t be more thankful to have her in my life. Bubba is my husband’s dog before we were married and he’s about five! And he’s such a love to be around. If you get a dog, you’ll be glad you did, Valerie. They become like your children.
    Have a wonderful week!

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    1. Thanks Cherie – As a Vet Tech/ Vet Nurse I am well aware of the human-animal bond. Although I know that any dog we get will become part of the family, I’m not ready to commit to the responsibility right now. This will be probably the longest we’ve ever been without a pet.

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