Looking for Trouble Again

Campus life is played out in front of me. Youth is wont to believe that they are immortal and impervious to disaster. But this is not a rant about people not wearing masks. Instead it is a little observation. I’ve had the opportunity to eavesdrop on a conversation as I was queued up to enter the building. I’m always amazed by the lack of decorum as the students discuss the most intimate details of their lives. I probably shouldn’t be as they post their entire lives on FB/Instagram/Snapchat/TicToc. A pretty girl was was showing her friend a nasty looking bruise on her arm while explaining that it was from “some rando guy” that had bought her some drinks and then thought she owed him. Her friend was sympathetic and just a little surprised that she 1. went to a bar and 2. let a strange dude buy her booze. The friend tried not to lecture her but in the course of her description of the events did make some valid points. I hope her friend’s concerns make an impression and that she swears off the rum. The next time she might not get so lucky…

A spot the size of a big thumb
The skin is raised and slightly numb
The result of a pushy man
He grabbed me to pull to his van, I felt so dumb

A firm grip I couldn’t refuse
My arm showed clearly the dark bruise
To the bathroom I begged to go
Out the back I flew like a crow, drunk on cheap booze

The dark circle reminds me how
A few drinks of rum can allow
Complete destruction of my plan
No more drinking Captain Morgan, I do avow

The above is a Florette, a poetry form developed by Jan Turner. It consists of a minimum of 2 four line stanzas. Each stanza has 4 lines with a syllable count of 8/8/8/12 and a rhyme scheme of a/a/b/a where the 8th syllable of the 4th line is an internal rhyme with the 3rd line. Don’t be confused. Just look at the poem.

37 thoughts on “Looking for Trouble Again

  1. I hope the girl with the bruise has learned a lesson and rethinks her social activities at the bar. There are those who would not take “no” for an answer.

    Thanks for sharing the Florette. It’s an interesting form of poetry and you did a great job with it.

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    1. Thanks Mary! I hadn’t tried the florette before and have to say it wasn’t as difficult as I had first thought. College is a time of learning and some of it happens outside the classroom. I think she got very lucky! It could have been tragically different!

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    1. You have me! I do tend to use poetry to order my words and express complex emotions. College students are acquiring knowledge – academic and personal. I hope she learned without having to repeat that lesson…

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  2. So many sad decisions…going to a bar in Covid times, thinking she owes a man something because he bought her a drink, and then discussing it in front of strangers. I honestly think the concept of privacy is going to die out with our generation. I just hope the man who bruised her doesn’t find any other woman who thinks she owes him something, and I hope she realizes that drinking can lead to very bad decisions.

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    1. Young drunk college girls. It is a bad situation. Hopefully she has learned a lesson. Of course there are predators on the lookout for the vulnerable. So many college aged students have no sense of decorum. They post everything online and then wonder why they didn’t get that job – I suppose they never considered that the HR folks look them up on FB…

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    1. Yeah I agree. Going out and mingling with strangers is not my idea of fun. To be young and foolish in the time of COVID can only lead to disaster… It is no wonder that the number of cases on campus have been traced back to specific venues…

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  3. Hi! I very much appreciate the explanation of the rhyme scheme – until today the only scheme I understood was 575. Also, impressed by how you took the story you overheard and turned it into a poem. I hope along with you that the young lady learned the right lesson. I hope she was not emboldened by her escape.

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    1. Thanks for the visit and comment! I’m pleased that I could expand your horizons as regards to poetry. Sometimes I wonder at the foolishness of youth, mostly because I was born 42 years old and never really had a taste of misspent youth…

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