Looking at Tears

I don’t like to cry in public. I don’t much like to cry in front of even Sparky. Usually I do any crying alone. There are a few things that will make me weep. I was home alone a couple weeks ago, while Sparky picked up a shift at the library, and I decided to turn on the TV and see what I’d been missing for the last few months. We get an “oldies” station that plays movies from the 1930s thru 1970s with an emphasis on the earlier Black & White movies. I caught the tail end of the Fred Astaire/Ginger Rogers movie “The Gay Divorcee” and before I knew it I was watching “The Little Princess” and sobbing and wiping away tears! Shirley Temple movies usually wring the tears from me. Of course it isn’t often that I see one any more. I started thinking about why this particular movie affects me so strongly. I’ve decided that the major reason is the sense of abandonment coupled with the helplessness of the character, Sara, played by Shirley Temple. There is a constant back and forth of having and losing – having a father and then him leaving, the party and then the cancellation of the party in the midst of the celebration, the luxury replaced by poverty, friends who become enemies, warmth withdrawn and left in the cold (and this is both physical and emotional), never wanting for food to being given barely enough to prevent outright starvation, being believed and then called a liar, from served to servant, and finally child to criminal! I suppose I always identified with the underdog and felt empathy for those who were tossed in fate’s storms. So I sat there and wasted 2 hours of my day and bawled like I’d just lost my best friend.
Are there any movies or books that tug on your heart and make you weep or am I alone in this??

89 thoughts on “Looking at Tears

  1. That is one of my favourite books! As a fictional character Sara seems to represent what is good in humankind.

    I was surprised to be moved to tears by a Japanese war film, “Barefoot Gen” – surprised, because it was animated. Had never cried for any films before that.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That was not a waste of 2 hours of your day. You must have needed to shed tears or it wouldn’t have happened. Something, whether it be stress, angst, worry, nerves, or tension must have been building up and the movie was the catalyst for your tears.
    I don’t shed tears over a movie. However, there are numerous movies about animals that I have never watched to the end because they are too sad. I have walked out of War Horse, Black Beauty, Flicka, Lassie , The Incredible Journey and Born Free.Devastating movies all!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I relish any opportunity to clear my tear ducts 😉

    Last movie I had a huge weep at, in an overcrowded cinema just after our 2 year lockdown eased, was the recently released “Elvis”. I’d been a huge Elvis fan as a child but found his changes bewildering to say the least. Well Baz Luhrmann set the records straight and I wept for Elvis, for those who used and abused him, and for fans like myself who lost a treasure far too early!

    Like

  4. I don’t cry much either…but I rarely see films anymore, nor am I reading much these days. My girls and I watch “Love Actually” every Christmas though, and I have to admit the scenes of people greeting each other in the airport at the end always make me cry. (K)

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I cried at the Colour Purple when Nettie is banished from Celie’s life by Mister, also when Shug tlls her she has a lovely smile, when she finds Nettie’s letters, and when she is reunited with her children Olivia and Adam.
    I also cried at The Elephant Man when Anne Bancroft’s character said ‘Mr Merrick, you’re not an Elephant Man at all, you’re Romeo’ and also when he is looking at the photo on the doctor’s mantle (Antony Hopkins) and his wife reaches out to him (Hannah Gordon).

    Like

  6. I don’t have any problem weeping in front of people. That said, I think that the last couple of years have brought my tears closer to the surface in a general sense. Any small, lovely thing can bring them up. I think it’s a catharsis that’s natural and human, but I grew up in an environment that had a thing about crying — cowboys DON’T cry. At my dad’s funeral I cried (duh) and the family looked at me as if I’d committed a heinous crime, all but my dad’s mom. She took me back to the mortuary limo and we sat together out of sight and cried our hearts out and held each other. BUT Aristotle wrote in his poetics that the point of drama is to allow people to feel emotions and satisfy their need for catharsis. It’s lovely that film provides that. ❤️

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Glad you had someone to cry with! I find that the older I get, the closer to the surface my emotions run. Makes going out to a movie a little dicey… I always have to remember to grab a fist of Kleenex!

      Liked by 1 person

                    1. I remember when there was a “heartworm season” and we’d be doing tests and running treatments and putting dogs on preventatives… Now it is year round instead of March through September. I used to dread March because we’d be slammed and I’d be putting in 14 hour days. It will be nice for you to have a breather. The slow time was when I got to do special projects – hope the same for you!

                      Like

                    2. I hope your boss can put you in charge of streamlining procedures, or writing a Standard Operating Procedures manual… It is kind of like house work – there is always something more to do!

                      Like

                    3. We have a four page handbook because the company is that casual. It will be more likely to go through boxes to line things up to sell. Stuff that should just be pitched.

                      Like

  7. Unfortunately I don’ t watch many movies nowadays. In the far past I watched them more . I was brokenhearted at watching old movies about the horrors in the first world war .
    However I remember very well Fred Astaire, Shirley temple , and Charlie chaplin to mention anglophone artists .
    Love ❤
    Michel

    Like

  8. In my stoic Protestant family, nobody cried and so, I feel ashamed when I cry over books or movies. But, as I grow older, I find I have less and less control and cry at the smallest provocation. Unexpected acts of kindness trigger tears faster than anything.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. I feel you. Same with me. Crying was something my father couldn’t handle. His stock phrase was, “Stop crying or I’ll give you something to cry about”! Now my emotions are much closer to the surface.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. I cry easily. Books, theatre, films, music. I like a good weep. Feels so liberating. Not when others are watching, though. Sometimes I have the impression one needs a license to cry in public… People stare as though one does something indecent.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. You’re totally right there. Crying in public makes others feel very uncomfortable. Unless it’s a cryfest – like one of those movies, where everyone knows to bring the family size box of tissues…

        Like

  10. I can’t feel much, but I enjoy crying. It’s like, any emotion, yay! I cried hysterically into my pillow when my sister not only didn’t include me in her babyshower, but she erased the comment I made about getting her something. It wasn’t just that. I’ve been cut out of several events and even my stepdad’s birthday. Anyway, I was cruel back to my sister but damn! is all I have to say. My family doesn’t usually acknowledge that I exist except when they need something, which is fine. This is both for their safety and because I’m a loser. There’s nothing to be proud of when it comes to me, not something anyone wants to associate with as I have nothing to offer. I’ll never escape this because I can’t keep certain things from happening and certain people who will come and come again.

    My dad told me that I burst into everyone’s life and disturb them. I told him that first weeks ago because he messes up everything. I will admit that I thought I had friends and kinda did that, and I was the creepy thing that came back after all those years they thought I was gone and thank God, right? Then I show up on Facebook, mwhahaha. Satan and his minions are always around me for another round of annoyance.

    Like

  11. I don’t like crying in front of anyone either – not even at funerals. I know it’s not healthy. I also identify with the underdog and people who have been wronged, denied opportunity in life. It’s funny that you mention Shirley Temple, she was my mom’s favorite.

    Like

    1. She was my mom’s favorite too! When she was young she wanted curls like Shirley Temple and endured a “perm” just so she could “look like Shirley”! As for shedding tears, I was labeled “cold hearted” at my grandmother’s funeral because I didn’t cry. I was all cried out by then…

      Like

  12. I almost cry at everything. Even at happy endings of movies. And at finales of tvshows. Or at any minor inconvenience in my life. I’m a crybaby

    Like

  13. I don’t cry over books or films — I don’t identify with the characters strongly enough to be emotional. The one thing that ALWAYS triggers tears is talking about 9/11, when I was at a meeting in Las Vegas for the week (I have always hated Las Vegas, but that was just over the top!). It amazes me sometimes that odd things will bring me close to tears — things I think I should have gotten over years ago!

    Like

    1. Seems that age has made me much more likely to cry over things even the things I think are of no real consequence. Of course the things that matter really make me fight back the tears!

      Like

  14. I always cry at the end of The Return of the King (the book) when Frodo sails off to Valinor with Bilbo and Gandalf. I’ve probably read those books at least 20 times since the first time I read them about 47 years ago and I still get emotional in all the same places. I have the same reaction in The Deathly Hallows (the book) when Harry is walking into the forest to make the ultimate sacrifice for his friends.

    Like

    1. I KNOW! I cried so hard the first time I read The Deathly Hallows it was a tough one for so many reasons. And when Dobby died and Harry was burying him I had to put the book down several times because I couldn’t read through my tears…

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s